Markel and Wottge Open Space Plan

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Next feedback Opportunity:

Please view the alternative designs and submit questions and comments on this project using the comment box below.


Project Background

The City and County of Broomfield is developing a new plan for the Markel and Wottge Open Spaces. This project is an exciting opportunity for Broomfield residents to participate in upgrading the vision for these open spaces. The goal of this project is to evaluate existing natural and cultural resources for both properties, and identify opportunities for public access and site improvements to preserve, restore, and activate the open spaces for public use while maintaining its natural beauty and wildlife habitat.

Site History

There are two separate sites being examined in the plan: the Wottge and Markel Open Spaces.

Wottge Open Space

Watch a video about the Wottge Open Space

Bernhard “Ben” Wottge moved to Colorado from Germany with his family when he was eight years old. The Wottge's purchased the land in 1955 and began farming, planting alfalfa hay, barley, and corn. After a period of drought, they bought cows and added a dairy to their farmstead. The property included a farmhouse, two bin granaries, and a dairy barn among other buildings.

Ben and his four siblings decided to sell part of the property after their parents passed away. He heard of the Broomfield Open Space and Trails Department buying a different property at the time and felt that preserving the Wottge land as open space would be a wonderful idea. Ben and his wife, Pam, continue to live on five acres of the farm planting grass hay. The remaining land is the Wottge Open Space and is planted with winter wheat.

Broomfield Open Space and Trails purchased this land in 2003 to maintain views of the mountains as well as preserve a piece of land that connects Broomfield to its agricultural history. The property has several large cottonwood trees that have been home to a great horned owl nest in past years. The expansive field provides habitat for a number of bird and small mammal species as well as a migration corridor for wildlife.

*The City and County of Broomfield have completed a soil restoration project on the northeast corner of the Wottge Open Space site, near the entrance across from Spyglass Dr. This restoration included soil testing, the removal of 3,476 cubic yards of poor-quality soil, rocks, and debris, and the import of high-quality topsoil and compost. Please know that this work was not part of the Wottge Open Space Plan and has been planned for some time.

Wottge Aerial Current Condition (below)


Markel Open Space

Watch a video about the Markel Open Space

Dr. Bill Markel and his wife Jean moved to Broomfield in 1958 after Dr. Markel left the Army Medical Corps. Broomfield was then described as a “brand new community,” and it turned out to be exactly what they were looking for. The Markels purchased their current property, and what is now open space, in 1968. Bill and Jean enjoyed the property for many years with their four children and the approximately fifty exchange students they hosted over several decades. When they decided to sell part of their original property, they contacted the Broomfield Open Space and Trails Department as a potential buyer so the land would remain as open space.

The City and County of Broomfield purchased the property in 2008. The Open Space has a pond that was built by the Markels shortly after they acquired the property. The pond is lined with tall cottonwoods providing shade and beautiful colors in the fall. Community Ditch also winds through the property. The Markels are happy that people will continue to enjoy the property for years to come the way they and their children did.

*At this time, the City and County of Broomfield does not own Parcel 4 located at 13781 Fox Ridge Drive. This 6-acre parcel is located in the northeast corner of the Markel site map. Even though the area is not owned by Broomfield, the area is being evaluated from a planning perspective to determine how the area could be combined with the larger Markel site in the future.

Markel Aerial Current Condition (below)


Next feedback Opportunity:

Please view the alternative designs and submit questions and comments on this project using the comment box below.


Project Background

The City and County of Broomfield is developing a new plan for the Markel and Wottge Open Spaces. This project is an exciting opportunity for Broomfield residents to participate in upgrading the vision for these open spaces. The goal of this project is to evaluate existing natural and cultural resources for both properties, and identify opportunities for public access and site improvements to preserve, restore, and activate the open spaces for public use while maintaining its natural beauty and wildlife habitat.

Site History

There are two separate sites being examined in the plan: the Wottge and Markel Open Spaces.

Wottge Open Space

Watch a video about the Wottge Open Space

Bernhard “Ben” Wottge moved to Colorado from Germany with his family when he was eight years old. The Wottge's purchased the land in 1955 and began farming, planting alfalfa hay, barley, and corn. After a period of drought, they bought cows and added a dairy to their farmstead. The property included a farmhouse, two bin granaries, and a dairy barn among other buildings.

Ben and his four siblings decided to sell part of the property after their parents passed away. He heard of the Broomfield Open Space and Trails Department buying a different property at the time and felt that preserving the Wottge land as open space would be a wonderful idea. Ben and his wife, Pam, continue to live on five acres of the farm planting grass hay. The remaining land is the Wottge Open Space and is planted with winter wheat.

Broomfield Open Space and Trails purchased this land in 2003 to maintain views of the mountains as well as preserve a piece of land that connects Broomfield to its agricultural history. The property has several large cottonwood trees that have been home to a great horned owl nest in past years. The expansive field provides habitat for a number of bird and small mammal species as well as a migration corridor for wildlife.

*The City and County of Broomfield have completed a soil restoration project on the northeast corner of the Wottge Open Space site, near the entrance across from Spyglass Dr. This restoration included soil testing, the removal of 3,476 cubic yards of poor-quality soil, rocks, and debris, and the import of high-quality topsoil and compost. Please know that this work was not part of the Wottge Open Space Plan and has been planned for some time.

Wottge Aerial Current Condition (below)


Markel Open Space

Watch a video about the Markel Open Space

Dr. Bill Markel and his wife Jean moved to Broomfield in 1958 after Dr. Markel left the Army Medical Corps. Broomfield was then described as a “brand new community,” and it turned out to be exactly what they were looking for. The Markels purchased their current property, and what is now open space, in 1968. Bill and Jean enjoyed the property for many years with their four children and the approximately fifty exchange students they hosted over several decades. When they decided to sell part of their original property, they contacted the Broomfield Open Space and Trails Department as a potential buyer so the land would remain as open space.

The City and County of Broomfield purchased the property in 2008. The Open Space has a pond that was built by the Markels shortly after they acquired the property. The pond is lined with tall cottonwoods providing shade and beautiful colors in the fall. Community Ditch also winds through the property. The Markels are happy that people will continue to enjoy the property for years to come the way they and their children did.

*At this time, the City and County of Broomfield does not own Parcel 4 located at 13781 Fox Ridge Drive. This 6-acre parcel is located in the northeast corner of the Markel site map. Even though the area is not owned by Broomfield, the area is being evaluated from a planning perspective to determine how the area could be combined with the larger Markel site in the future.

Markel Aerial Current Condition (below)


What questions or comments do you have concerning the Markel and Wottge Open Space properties?

Submit questions and comments concerning the Markel and Wottge Open Space properties. 

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Would you please use full cut off lighting fixtures (&ideally WARM color temperatures)… my preference is not to use LEDs; however, sadly, i do not expect that you have another option at this time). This is from someone who is highly sensitive to LED lighting. Thank you for receiving my question/comment.

    Stacie asked 24 days ago

    Thank you for your comment. We are not planning on any lighting at this time. Lighting is not typically placed on Open Space properties. If lighting is deemed necessary in the future for safety concerns, the lighting typically is focused downward to minimize any light impacts.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    For the Wottge space, can you share some of specifics of the type of use that has been considered for the area marked as "open for agricultural use" ? Is this going to be open to the public?

    Ricardo asked 26 days ago

    Thank you for this question. Yes, the Wottge Open Space is currently designed to remain as agricultural use as it was historically used by the Wottges for many years. The site would still be public open space and would have some passive recreation elements that are compatible with agriculture, such as trails. The trails are designed to allow the public to pass through the property on the trails while still maintaining a large area for agriculture. The Field Open Space is an example of this type of Open Space use. Winter Wheat has typically been the crop that is planted and harvested in these cases. Please let us know if we can provide any additional information.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Leaving land in it’s natural state in my opinion is the reason for having open space areas. These areas that are untouched provide homes to many native plants and animals species. We as community members get to view this beautiful and natural connection in our own backyard. If more people were to encroach on the land this would impact our own ecosystem. We already have lake link trail and parks in the vicinity so please consider the value of untouched space to our community and our environment.

    WWB asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for your comment. Please fill out the survey a www.broomfieldvoice.com/markelwottgeplan/survey_tools/survey-designs-2 if you have not done so already so your comment can be incorporated into the survey results on the concept plans.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    I’m curious why Plans 1 and 2 have “possible connector” to path from Willow Wood Dr when there is already a designated concrete path connector a mere four houses away on Willow Wood Ct? This is completely unnecessary intrusion on natural preservation.

    Concerned resident asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for your comment. The "possible connector" from Willow Wood Drive offers access to the Wottge Open Space for residents on Willow Wood Drive, Stoney Brook Drive, and areas to the south of  the existing open lands corridor such as Brookside Drive, Sage Brush Drive, etc. This connection is shown so residents can indicate if they wish to have this access point. Please fill out the design survey at https://www.broomfieldvoice.com/markelwottgeplan/survey_tools/survey-designs-2 so your comment can be incorporated into the survey results for the concept plans.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    I was unable to attend the presentation on the 16th. Will you be putting out the proposed plans to those in the area to vote on? Thank you.

    Sharon K asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for your interest. Yes, all of the materials from the Open House are available at broomfieldvoice.org/markelWottgePlan.There are links to the designs and a survey to provide feedback on the designs at the top of the page. The survey will close on March 5. Please let us know if you have any questions or thoughts, we are happy to discuss further. Thank you for your time and thoughts.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    I hope that a horse trail is still being considered for these properties.

    James Weingardt asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your comment. The Wottge Open Space did have a "proposed" equestrian trail noted in the 2005 Open Space, Parks, Recreation and Trails Plan (OSPRT Plan). Over the past 18 years since the OPSRT Plan was developed, the surrounding residential development now has primarily concrete trails and the busy intersection of Dillon Road and Sheridan Boulevard result in some safety concerns with this concept. However, please attend the Open House or review the meeting materials after the meeting if you cannot attend, so you can voice your viewpoint in the survey. We are in the early stages of the planning process and welcome your comments.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Could agriculture education in the form of a garden or garden(s) be applicable somewhere on this open space site?

    l asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your comment. Interpretive signs focusing on agriculture, history, and the environment are currently in the proposed alternatives. Also, habitat enhancements are included in the alternative concept plans. The Wottge Open Space is proposed to remain as an agricultural site. Two educational gardens already exist at the Brunner Farmhouse (640 Main Street) and Metzger Farm Open Space (12080 Lowell Blvd.). Please attend the open house and fill out the survey with your comments or if you are unable to attend the meeting, visit the Broomfield Voice project page to review the meeting materials. We are in the early stages of the planning process and welcome your comments.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    I recently moved to Broomfield and one of the attractions for me was the open space. Please continue to make this available to all. Well done Broomfield Open Space!

    GSJ Broomfield resident one year asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your comment.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Can the City please address the impetus for these discussions? Why change now after 20 years? Why continue more development and disruption to the natural space? The Wottage open space provides a necessary reprieve from development that continues in this area. The Dillon Point development, the encroachment on open space inhabitants, and strain to the open space flood plain are very concerning. In response to previous comments the area is already home to birds of prey—hawks and owls—coyotes, fox, and does not need development or prairie dogs relocated to the site.

    25 Yr Broomfield Resident asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your comment. Open space can include amenities such as trails, wildlife viewing decks, shade structures and interpretive signs that are compatible with the property's character and environment. These two sites were purchased as public open space with the Open Space Sales and Use Tax. For Broomfield's larger open space sites, a management plan is typically created. Community engagement is part of this planning process. An environmental analysis is also one of the elements of the planning process to make sure any proposed amenities are compatible with a site's natural resources. Please attend the February 16 open house to voice your viewpoint! If you are unable to attend the open house, meeting materials will be posted on the Broomfield Voice page soon after the meeting.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    I've lived in Broomfield for 30+ years. One of the best things the City has ever done is The Commons. Bike/walking paths, like the south side of The Commons, with maybe a picnic shelter on one of the corners? Maybe move some prairie dogs in and that'll attract some hawks, owls, and coyotes.

    BRMRES asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your comment.  We are proposing several options for walking paths and habitat enhancement for review by community members at the open house on February 16; please view the top of this page for event details.

Page last updated: 22 Mar 2023, 01:45 PM